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Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

yogaYoga has been used as a ‘medical’ discipline for centuries [1] – although its original adherents would not have thought of it as such. As a fusion of the physical and the spiritual, yoga was always known to have healing properties, but these were often considered tangential to the discipline’s main aim of enhancing spiritual and personal efficacy. However, in more recent years, the spiritual and physical aspects of yoga have been cruelly separated by a great many sources. Some use yoga as a purely physical exercise, neglecting the spiritual aspects in the name of getting a toned body [2]. Others use it as a purely spiritual discipline, neglecting correct posture etc in favor of higher consciousness. However, despite this, the world of modern medicine is increasingly turning its eyes upon yoga and its potential for healing. And when we look at yoga as a modern healing tool, we begin to see that yoga truly does need to be considered as a holistic – i.e. physical and spiritual – medium in order to achieve its full effects.

Yoga For Mental Health

One of the main points of intersection for modern medicine and yoga is that of mental health. Studies have found that substance abusers going through withdrawal benefit very much from yoga sessions – not only because it helps to ease the discomfort in their suffering bodies, but because it helps them to reconnect with those bodies on a deeper level. This new sense of connection often engenders respect, and enables people who have been abusing their bodies for years to take detoxing seriously [3], and to commit to kicking their damaging habits. Simultaneously, it helps them to relax, and combats feelings of depression, inadequacy, and anxiety which often afflict recovering addicts. Needless to say, these effects are also fantastic for people suffering from other neuroses. Modern doctors are increasingly recommending that their patients undertake a course of yoga for mental health reasons [4]. However, the reason yoga works so well for mental health is that it acts on the mind THROUGH the body, rather than (as many other forms of mental health therapy do) working on the mind from an external source.

Yoga For Pain Relief

Several studies have proven yoga effective in reducing the experience of pain. On a very simple level, the practice of yoga can help to sort out postural issues, and generally strengthens the body. This can reduce or even outright eradicate the symptoms of many muscular and skeletal problems [5]. So far, so obvious. However, yoga can also help with more ephemeral pain – despite having no apparent ‘physical’ action upon the source of the pain. Patients suffering from the pain of chronic pancreatitis were found to consider their pain improved after a course of yoga [6]. What is interesting about this is that the yoga had had no tangible effect upon the condition itself – what had changed, it seems, was the patient’s experience of their pain. Pain is a complicated medical conundrum, but we know that a lot of it originates within the mind. It is this pain that the yoga seemed to be working on. Scientists are not entirely sure how yoga achieves this, but it’s thought that yoga’s power to reduce stress and boost mood also improves the patient’s own perception of the pain they’re experiencing. Yoga’s effects on the mind, therefore, percolate down through the body, altering our experience of physical problems.

Interconnected Yoga

Modern medicine has not been slow to capitalise upon yoga’s painkilling and mental health potential. And the research it’s doing into yoga’s modern medical possibilities reveals the fundamental mind-body interconnectedness of the discipline. This is something which we all once knew, and all took for granted. However, in recent years, many have lost sight of this fact. They’ve ‘separated’ a practice which needs to be considered a holistic ‘whole’ in order to function correctly into component ‘parts’ – the physical and the mental/spiritual. On their own, these aspects are of little use. As modern medical research is showing us, each ‘part’ relies on the other to do its job. This is something we could all do with remembering as we engage in our own yogic disciplines.

[1] “A Brief History Of Yoga: From Ancient Hindu Scriptures To The Modern, Westernized Practice”

[2]  “6-Minute Total-Body Toning Yoga”

[3]  “Your Guide to Holistic Detoxification from Drugs and Alcohol”

[4]  “Yoga for Psychiatry and Mental Health: An Ancient Practice with Modern Relevance”

[5]  “3 Ways Yoga Improves Your Joint System And Skeletal Structure”

[6] “Yoga for rehabilitation in chronic pancreatitis”

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If you are battling a bulge that just won’t go away, then Vaser liposuction might be exactly what you need. Vaser Liposuction is a simple procedure that removes excess fat in stubborn areas; areas that exercise and diet just can’t hit. Vaser Liposuction is different from regular liposuctions and it uses state of the art ultrasound technology to reshape the body. When a person gets liposuction, they remove fat and smooth out problem areas. It is an easy way to contour your body when diet and exercise don’t work. With Vaser Liposuction ultrasonic waves break up and separate fat cells for removal while leaving vital tissues unharmed.

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Liposuction was first introduced in the 1979. Back then, technology was nowhere near where it is today; liposuction got a bad rap. Liposuction was considered an unsafe and painful process; unfortunately, some people still think this is the case.

Today, when properly done, Vaser liposuction has almost no risks or side-effects; the procedure is performed on an outpatient basis. Patients never even have to step foot into a hospital to get the procedure done. Vaser Liposuction works to shrink your skin and shape your body. If you are close to a normal weight with just a few problem areas, then you are a perfect candidate for liposuction.

Vaser Liposuction is a quick and easy procedure; you simply show up at the office and leave once the procedure is done. With liposuction, there are no long hospital stays or inconvenient recovery times.

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Breast augmentation is also known as Augmentation mammoplasty and is surgical process to increase the size, shape of a woman’s breasts. There are 2 types of breast implants silicone, saline and the composite filler.  The surgeon will place silicone, saline implants under the chest muscles or breast tissue to increase the size of breasts. The saline implant contains elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution and the silicone implant posses viscous silicone gel; and the other composition implants contains fillers such as polypropylene, soy oil etc.

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Breast augmentation is elective surgery and it is not covered by insurance plans. Women over the age 18 are a good fit for Saline Implants and the women over the age 22 are suitable for Silicone Gel Implants. Breast implants are not permanent devices, and the people who undergone Breast augmentation may need additional surgeries on your breasts because of complications to get better shape.

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